Tutorial #15: Running Comanche Gold on Windows 10


There are those indescribable moments in life when you come across a relic from the past and are instantly flooded with fond memories. This was precisely the case when I stumbled across a mention of Comanche 3 on the web, one of the earliest PC games in my life that I spent countless hours on at a friend's place (though candidly it was more of watching than playing, ala wingman to the PC occupier).

This meant I couldn't resist the temptation of digging through my treasure trove for the Comanche Gold disc. Comanche Gold is essentially Comanche 3 for Windows with few extra missions and being 32-bit meant it could be run natively on current 64-bit PCs without the need for virtualisation. The geek in me couldn't resist the challenge of getting it running once again on Windows 10 (Creators Update Build 15063.413 as of this writing) and hence this guide details out the steps to getting it done.

First things first, you need to have the following things on hand:

1. The Game Disc, of course, though I recommend creating an image of it for sheer convenience. The image can be directly mounted on Windows 10 as a DVD drive, can be archived and used on tablets that lack an optical drive.

2. Comanche Gold Patch Pack: I had come across various mentions of patches for Windows 7/8/10 but most of the links were long dead. However, the most recent mention of it can be found here. All credit is due to the original author(s) and contributor(s) of the patch. Since things tend to get lost with time, I have uploaded a copy of the patch to Google Drive.

3. DXGL: This seems to be the real differentiator in getting the game to run properly on Windows 10 with the correct video mode. As of this writing, the version used was 0.5.11.

The ideal scenario would have been that I just install the game and replace the files with the patch as depicted in the forum post from SimHQ that I have linked to previously. However, that is not how it panned out for me and I had to engage in some trial and error to get the game working. Below are the fruits of my labour laid out in sequence.

1. Install the game to a simple directory structure (eg.: C:\Games\Comanche Gold) using the 'Large Install' option. Installation to the default 'Program Files' directory resulted in the game starting in the 'Multiplayer only No-CD' mode, despite the fact that the patch contains an exe that removes the CD verification.

2. Extract the contents of the Comanche Gold Patch Pack to the root game directory, overwriting files wherever necessary.

3. Install DXGL, add the Wc3.exe file and retain all the default settings. The only change I made was to change the Video mode to 'Aspect corrected stretch' but you can easily change this to 'Stretch to screen' in case you are not a fan of letterboxing.

4. At this stage, I still couldn't get the Wc3 exe to launch as it only lead to a Windows error, none of which could be rectified using any of the compatibility options. Turns out the game needs the obscure 'DirectPlay' feature in Windows to be enabled which is a long deprecated DirectX API.

As it turned out, this was the last hoop I had to go through. Thereafter, the game launched in full screen mode and I was able to push the resolution to 1024*768, though 1280*1024 led the game to crash. Considering the age of the game, I would say it is an achievement to get it working perfectly two decades later. Love it or hate it, Windows compatibility and its legacy support is worth its weight in nostalgia, in spite of all the cruft.

(Originally published on July 4, 2017)

Update #1 (May 12, 2018): The game installs and works fine on the April 2018 Update of Windows 10 (Build 1803) with the same instructions.



Things are now much easier as even the default settings on the current version of DXGL (0.5.13) work fine and Windows automatically prompts the installation of 'DirectPlay'. I would still recommend using the 'Aspect corrected stretch' option as otherwise Windows changes the resolution rapidly and pops up a 'fix blurry text' prompt on first run.


Musing #40: Twin Peaks


Considering the time when Twin Peaks was first broadcast, there was no means for me to have even been aware of its existence. However, when I did catch it a few years ago, it was every bit as unconventional and weird as I presume it was when first broadcast. So, why should weirdness matter in itself? For one, its abstraction is both, decipherable and indecipherable in equal parts. At one end, it is grounded to the world we live in and yet there is seemingly something mystic about it, beyond the comprehension of ordinary humans who go about their daily lives. Others would need nothing more than the words - David Lynch.

The major pitfall of the series was the fact that it totally ran off rails in the second season. The first season ended with a cliffhanger that was tied up neatly halfway through the second season and thereafter it was simply an exercise in pain, right up till the final episode of the second season. Fire Walk with Me was unadulterated David Lynch but it was a painful watch for the most part. This put the emphasis on how much the series was dependent on its characters, none more so than Coop and their interactions, rather than the weird world they lived in.

The Return was an unexpected bonanza for the fans and it was more of an emotional rollercoaster than anything else, especially when you watch the enigmatic characters having to accept the realities of the world they live, rather than act in. At the same time, we couldn't have expected David Lynch to dial down the nob on weirdness or to offer a straightforward resolution. Well, he almost did until the final episode of the season. But evil couldn't end with BOB with Judy around and Coop couldn't help believing that he could change the future with the past.

Does the finale leave a lot of loose ends? Yes, it does and thankfully so. In the cinematic world of happy endings, why should we expect everything to be gift wrapped and delivered to the door? There is a kind of finality in knowing that all characters, new and old, are going to go about their lives in Twin Peaks the way they had for the 25 years between seasons 2 and 3, with all their quirks intact, at least in the dimension or timeline we can relate to. Similarly, the fight between good and evil shall continue, irrespective of the past and the dimension or timeline. Will Coop fight it out? Sure, he would. Do we need to see this happen? I think not. After all, the cat and mouse game has always been an ongoing one.

Review #42: Philips AZ-1852/98 Soudmachine

For someone born in the 80s, the nostalgia of using a cassette player once again is far too strong, especially if you have a collection collecting dust in a cabinet. In case it's not clear already, then the only reason I bought this player was to digitize the treasure trove of memories embedded in some of the cassettes, not the songs that can be found on streaming services but the self-recorded and obscure ones. However, on the practical front, this player was intended for my parents who wish to have an easy way of re-listening to their specific choice of music which includes regional ones that can't be found in a digital format anymore.

The unit is quite compact and meant to be portable, though at 2.8 kg, it is on par with bulky laptops. It has a collapsible handle up top and support for on-the-go usage through 6 R14 cells. It also comes with a remote, though its usage is mainly limited to controlling CD tracks and the recording functions. To go in to further details, I decided to breakup this review in to various pertinent sections. Since this is first and foremost a music player, I think I should start with the sound quality.

A. Sound Quality: The sound quality is definitely not something to write home about but once you temper your expectations for the price you are paying, it is certainly decent. It will not hold a candle to any home sound system nor can it fulfil the role of a party boom box. However, it can certainly form an integral part of your home entertainment setup, especially as an input source.

The 2 x 1W RMS speaker output is certainly loud enough to fill up a decent sized room and its quality should meet the expectation of any non-discerning listener. It comes with Dynamic Bass Boost (DBB) which I presume is primarily aimed at countering Sony's Mega Bass. Its difference can certainly be felt as it significantly boosts the lower frequencies and can enliven beat heavy music. However, at the same time it boosts the volume which unfortunately may be construed as a "better effect" by most. But that is definitely not the case for all genres of music as it significantly muddies up instrumental and vocal songs. Hence, I would advise judgement when using this setting as it will depend largely on personal preference.

Fortunately, the player comes with a Headphone jack at the back, so you can plug in a speaker system of preference or keep the tunes to yourself if you so desire and enjoy a much higher quality experience.

B. Input Sources: The input source is controlled using a sliding switch and has the following options:

B1. Tape: By default, the player is in the 'Tape' mode because it also happens to be the 'Off' mode. This intertwining of functions can cause some issues which I have described later in the 'Recording/Ripping section. However, the thing to note is that the tape has its own set of mechanical controls and hence is unaffected by the controls on the remote. Although all my cassettes are now decades old, they played quite well out of the box. At a time when we are used to skipping in discrete steps of 5 or 10 seconds, it was fun to use the analogue fast-forward/rewind functions once again. The rewinding/forwarding speed is much higher than the play function, which might be desirable considering that patience is a rarer virtue these days compared to when the cassette was invented.

B2. FM: Considering the fact that most high-end phones have dropped support for FM radio, having a FM player at home feels like a novelty. Having the mediumwave (MW) and shortwave (SW) options to go along with FM would have been cool but considering that the frequency of people tuning in to radio (see what I did there!) has declined, the practicality of not having them is understandable. Depending on how you see it, the presence of the old school manual tuner can be seen as a blessing or a curse. As with the manual volume controls, the inaccessibility of switching channels using a remote might be irksome for many. On the flip side, the unit has a rather long antenna which measures about 31 inches when extended and 9 inches when retracted to fit at the back of the player. This certainly ensures unparalleled coverage within the confines of the walls of the house.

B3. USB: A music player wouldn't be one if it didn't support MP3 files, so this one supports it too. Playback for 320 Kbps files work fine and it is supposed to have support for WMA v9, but other popular file formats like AAC are not supported. This mode can also be used to playback any recorded files, but the order of playback is such that is first plays the files stored directly on the pen drive followed by the ones stored in folders. While SD cards are not supported directly, even cheap card readers work fine with the device. As far as file formats go, FAT32 is the only logical option.

B4. CD: This is the top most option on the source switch but definitely not the last accessible input source (see next). Being a digital source, like USB, it can be controlled using the remote which is mainly limited to skipping tracks and pausing/stopping.

B5. Auxiliary: This option is not present on the source switch but is visible as "AU" on the display as soon as you connect the headphone jack of a device to the 'MP3-Link' switch at the back of the unit.

C. Recording/Ripping: Since this happens to be one of the USPs of this device and also the source of much discontentment among buyers who fail to get it to work properly.

On the face of it, the recording process is the same irrespective of the source.

a. Press the 'USB Rec' to the left of the display or the 'Rec' button on the remote to start recording

b. Press the 'Stop' button to the left of the display or on the remote to stop recording

However, the major source of confusion arises because of two aspects:

a. The actual recording begins 7 secs after the press of the button when the "RIP" symbol starts blinking on the display

b. The mechanical cassette controls are independent of the digital ones used for the recording

Thus, I feel the process needs to be further elucidated:

C1. Cassette digitization: This happens to be the trickiest of all due to the fact that the cassette player works independently of the digital controls present on the player as well as the remote. The method I found to be most convenient is as follows:

a. Play (FF/RW) the cassette till the beginning of a song and press the 'Pause' button on the cassette control panel. The player allows both the Play and the Pause button to be depressed at the same time.

b. Start the recording using the 'USB Rec' button on the player or 'Rec' button the remote and wait about 6 seconds.

c. Release the 'Pause' button on the cassette controls just as the 'RIP' symbol begins to flash. This indicates that the transfer of music from the tape to the USB device has started.

d. If you don't wish to separate tracks later, then stop the recording at the end of each track using the digital 'Stop' button to the left of the display or on the remote while simultaneously pressing the 'Pause' button on the cassette control panel. You have to repeat the procedure for each track on the cassette.

e. It is important to note that the 'Tape' and 'Off' modes are one and the same as far as the source switch is concerned. Hence, allowing the tape to auto stop results in the player being switched off immediately. This causes the file being written on the USB drive to be lost. Hence, you should make it a point to use the digital 'Stop' button whenever you wish the file to be written and this should be before the tape auto stops.

C2. CD Ripping/Copying: This is the most futile feature of the device since the resulting MP3 files are of only 128 Kbps constant bit rate. This works fine for cassettes as the quality is comparable but it is an abomination as far as CDs are concerned. Moreover, the ripping is being done in real time as against the faster speeds achievable on computer CD drives. The saving grace is that the 7-sec recording lag doesn't impact CD ripping as being a digital source, the player is able to hold the playback till the recording begins.

In case you are using a MP3/WMA CD, it simply copies the files to the USB drive which is again pointless since you can copy the files much faster on a PC. Also, for some strange reason it allows the CD to be ripped to a cassette. Figure that out!

C3. Radio recording: As with the CD, you can record to a pen drive or a cassette. However, you must remember that the actual recording will start 7 seconds after you press the recording button, so capturing something as you hear it is out of the question.

To sum it up, apart from digitizing of cassettes, the recording/ripping function isn't of much use due to the low quality (128 Kbps) and the 7-sec lag to the start of a recording. The recorded files are numerically organized in sub-folders within a 'RECORD' folder on the USB drive as 'CDREC_XX' for CD Ripping, 'COPY_XX' for CD Copying and 'LINE_IN' for cassette and radio recordings.

D. Price: I have kept Price as the last parameter because I think the device is totally worth it, as long as you are not paying the MRP of INR 5199. I purchased it for INR 4799 along with a 15% cashback offer on Amazon which puts it effectively at INR 4079. At that price, this device justifies its value in memories.

Musing #18: Memory and Nostalgia

As someone raised through the 90s with Walkmans, Mix Tapes, 8 & 16-bit consoles, VHS tapes and the rise of the WWW; the nostalgia is always far too strong. It provides welcome relief when the mind decides to stray from the humdrum of every day life. Hence, it is not a surprise to see serials, movies, games, music trying to milk this in a big way and let's be honest, there is no guilt in getting milked. It is for nothing then that nostalgia is said to be opium for the masses (I am sure Karl Marx wouldn't object to this subterfuge).

While I initially wanted to delve on nostalgia, my thoughts have since strayed on to the subject of memories itself. Nostalgia to me is simply a product of memories which puts forth the question of whether life itself is all about memories. Just think of it for a moment, every pleasurable and recollectable activity has the sole purpose of creating memories that we can reminiscence about. While the experience wears off with the snap of the fingers, the memories live on through photos and videos. This establishes the chain of posterity that strings generations together. As much as one lives a moment, the ultimate goal is to relive it for self and others.

This may be too simple a way of defining life but still not a difficult tenet to live by. The beauty of it all is that the quality of the memories truly lie in the mind of the beholder. One may argue that this quality doesn't exist and is nothing more than a product of rose-tinted glasses, but that may be digressing from the topic. Memories and by consequence nostalgia may exercise a function no different from opium in attaining a higher sense of euphoria but while opium may be the same for everyone, memories truly aren't.

The harmful effect of this "drug" is that you end up living in the past and of not being able to just let go. However, that again would just be a generalization for it really comes down to how you utilize it. Brooding over may not be a great idea but to recall it for a brief moment of elation ought not to scorned. I have somehow ended up defending nostalgia when in fact it was a spontaneous outpour of my thoughts at having just experienced it. I am not one to complain about something that brings a smile to my face and makes me look at the passing world in pictures of emotions.

Musing #15: Flip It!



It was bound to be a day of unsubdued excitement, but instead it turned out to be one of abject disappointment. There is a time in everyone's life when one aspires to something that is bound to be elusive. For me, that has been the case with flip phones. As a student in India in early 2000s, you had to pare down your expectations for a phone and a colour screen in itself was perhaps a defining feature. Against this backdrop, I was particularly elated at having been able to cajole the powers that be in to getting me the Samsung X100 which I considered to be superior to the C100 that occupied the palms of some of my friends. It also ushered in some of the best time I spent on the Web in collaborating internationally with other owners of the device in creating (or rather theming) custom ROMs for the device. May be that is a story for another time.

When checking reviews for mobiles in that era, there was no escaping the Moto Razr V3 as the aspirational device. There was never going to be an opportunity of ever grabbing one, but there was nothing to stop you from drooling over it either. The one that I did handle was the Nokia N76 which I must admit was something I would have liked to possess back in the day. However, as is the case with technology, the form factor happened to be a fad that passed away as rectangular slabs with big screens became ubiquitous. However, a part of me couldn't let go of it for I must admit that I have checked for refurbished V3s on AliExpress and somehow withheld myself from making an impulsive purchase. At the same time, I couldn't for some reason escape from the form factor as it happened to find a place in anime as well as in TV series from times gone by.

Hence, the recent Moto teaser featuring the Moto V3 filled me up with some excitement though not with total glee for I have been disappointed by the offerings from Samsung and Gionee in the recent past. As it happens, even that turned out to be a mere illusion. Till the next time, there is always hope and nostalgia.