Review #56: Xgimi Z6 Polar ★★★★½

Update #1 (March 1, 2019):

In my video review, I had stated the audio to be just about good enough, despite the Harman Kardon branding. In fact, I would still recommend getting an external speaker for the best experience. However, if that is not possible, then the wizardry mentioned subsequently will enable you to get the most out of the Z6 speakers.


As it turns out, Xgimi has a hidden "Design Menu" within GMUI which can be accessed, at least in the case of Z6, by long-pressing the "right" direction key on the 'System Information' screen. The "hidden" menu pops up on the left as seen in the above image. At this point, I should make it clear that the 'Audio' settings that I am discussing is listed under 'Non-standard options', so there is no guarantee that it wouldn't damage the device. Hence, caution is advised.

Within the 'Audio' menu, there is a "prescale" option that goes from '0x00' to '0xff' in Hex, or "00" to "255" if you prefer Base 10. My rather rusty knowledge of electronics from eons ago helps me recollect the use of a prescaler in a microcontroller to determine which oscillator pulse triggers an interrupt. How the prescale value specifically impacts the audio in this case is beyond me.

But impact the audio it does. The default value is set at '0x01' and on changing it downwards, I could immediately perceive an increase in volume while incrementing it didn't seem to have much of an impact. Thus, it was time to note down some observations. I changed the value to 2 levels from default in either direction and then to various quarter levels (25%, 50%, 75%) to gauge the impact.

Prescale Value
Decimal Notation
Max dB
Avg dB
Comments
0x00
0
96
86
-
0x01 (Default)
1
88
76
-
0x02
2
90
76
-
0x03
3
88
77
-
0x3f
63
93
82
-
0x7f
127
95
86
-
0xbf
191
95
88
Moderate distortion
0xff
255
95
89
Extreme distortion

If I don't go by the values alone, then I would say '0xff' seems the loudest, probably because it is also extremely harsh to listen to. Practically, '0x00' and '0x7f' are the best values for this option. They are nearly identical in volume, but I found the sound from '0x7f' to be livelier, probably because it adds the right amount of "harshness" that becomes unbearable at the higher values.

It is miles away from the quality I get from the JBL Xtreme, but in terms of loudness, it makes the Z6 much more suitable for a small room.


Original Article (December 18, 2018):

My previous post on the Z6 alluded to the upcoming review but it was around that time I decided to embrace the video format over written words, not that you are spared reading, as the video is littered with text overlays.

It also provided me an opportunity to try out various non-linear editing systems (NLE) and I eventually settled on Lightworks. Considering it took me a few hours to come up with this output, I can't recommend it enough, simply for its lack of a learning curve, though I expect mastery of it to take ages. The video itself is a farrago of poorly shot video, PowerPoint slides and images, so make of it what you may.

The down side to using the free version is that export is limited to 720p but I am sure you can live with that. With that (again), I will let the video to do the talking, especially as I haven't done any.


Musing #56: My First Smartwatch Face (McWatchFace)


The watch face has registered an average of 100 downloads a day since it was published, despite the fact that I have not publicised it anywhere else. It is simply through discovery on the Galaxy App Store and I am humbled by its popularity.

A smart life deserves a smartwatch, or perhaps it is smarter to be without one. Setting wisdom aside, I purchased my first one earlier this week - Samsung Gear Fit2 Pro. By being 1/3rd as expensive as a WiFi-only Series 3 Apple Watch, it won my wallet, if not my heart. I will reserve judgement on the device for the review, which isn't likely to materialise until I have used it extensively.

This post, then, is about a watch face, to be precise, my first creation of it. Kudos to Samsung for making available an easy-to-use designer, utilising which I was able to create the watch face in hours and survive the royal wedding. Having not found what I was looking for, I decided to create one for myself. The focus in this case was on information density and making the most of the colours on the AMOLED display without straining the battery life excessively.


The result is a crowded watch face that includes all the details that I could wish for. Besides the inclusion of all the fitness information, the icons for weather, music, settings, calendar, step count, floors and heart rate are all tapable with the date redirecting to the 'Today' view.


I was also inclined to keep the display "always-on" and hence chose a minimalist approach for this scenario. It fulfils the purpose of telling time while making it possible to keep an eye on the ever-draining battery. As per the analysis available within the designer, the current on pixel ratio is 1.5% with the minimum being below 1%.

I will mostly publish this watch face in the Samsung Galaxy App Store in the coming week, so be on the lookout for that. On the other hand, if you have some suggestions for future watch faces, then don't hesitate to leave a comment.

(Originally published on May 19, 2018)

Update #1 (May 20, 2018): The higher than expected battery drain in the "always on" mode over the past few hours made me investigate the possibilities of reducing the power consumption while still retaining this mode. A little bit of digging brought up this article which indicates that the next best thing to black is green. Effecting this change for the "always on" mode produces the following result:


The maximum 'Current on Pixel Ratio' is now 1/3rd (there's that ratio again!) of the original one. In fact due to the usage of green, this ratio now remains more or less constant and drops to 0.4% on certain occasions. Finally, I am not open to compromising the "Active" mode too much for power saving, but I have demoted the white to "seconds" which should help a bit.


Update #2 (May 22, 2018): A few more tweaks and optimisations went in to the watch face over the past couple of days and I assume that it can't get any denser than this. With the audience of one being satisfied, I have submitted the watch face to the 'Samsung Galaxy Apps' store and hope that it makes its way through to countless others. For now, I shall leave you with a cover image.

Update #3 (May 24, 2018): The watch face has been approved and is now available on the Samsung Galaxy App store. As an homage to Boaty McBoatface, I have named it as McWatchFace, so you know how to find it.

Update #4 (June 2, 2018): v1.0.2 was published earlier this week and it introduced the option of choosing the 'Distance Unit' besides squashing some bugs. I had started off with the intent of having a single watch face but a bug in Gear Watch Designer prevented me from implementing the 12/24H toggle. Moreover, since the toggle is dependent on the phone, it might be a good idea to have separate watch faces. I might revisit this idea later but for now I suppose I could move towards experimenting with the other features available in GWD.

Update #5 (June 10, 2018): v1.0.3 ushers in animation, starting with the weather icon. I have also published a YouTube video depicting the features of the watch face, as of this version.


Yours truly has also presented own self with a 'signature edition', remarkably named 'MyWatchFace'. Unfortunately, there is no means for user customisation, so this one remains in my sole possession.


Update #6 (June 12, 2018): Samsung seems to have a really inconsistent policy. While v1.0.3 of the 12-Hour version was published without any issues, the similar 24-hour variant was rejected for not supporting Chinese and Arabic.

It would  make sense if the issue was replicable but the emulator as well as my Gear Fit2 Pro show the date just fine in all languages including Chinese and Arabic. It should be mentioned that the language on the Gear Fit2 Pro mirrors that of the phone, so testing the languages implies changing the  primary language of the phone which gets ridiculous real fast.

So, to take the ridiculousness up a notch, I have submitted the same file once again as one can't resolve an issue that doesn't exist. May be I will catch a break and the watch face will pass through as-is or otherwise some minor tweak might be in order.

Update #7 (June 14, 2018): Unsurprisingly, the watch face was published as submitted and with that I have decided to bring the development of this watch face to an end. Hopefully, I will have time further down the line to create other unique watch faces, in which case they should eventually end up at the Galaxy App Store.

Musing #46: Saitek R440 Force Feedback Wheel


There are some items that you hold fond memories of but there comes a time when you have to let it go. I suppose I am attaching a bit too much emotion to an inanimate object, but the Saitek R440 Force Feedback certainly evokes them. After all, it happened to be my first and only gaming wheel.

For its price, it was hard to beat the R440. The price certainly made it easier to convince irate parents who would otherwise be bothered at having another wasteful "toy" around. But, the R440 was anything but that. It did most of what any of the more expensive wheels would do, if you could temper your expectations. It was built like a tank and the exaggerated force feedback certainly provided one of the best arm exercises you can get.

It was then, very difficult to let it go, especially as it still worked the way it did when it was first unboxed, eons ago. No sim or arcade game was ever an obstacle, unless the game manufacturer chose to not support custom wheels. As a swansong, I couldn't help but immortalise it through the following YouTube video.


For those still hooked on to the device, following are some useful links and instructions that might come in handy.

Drivers: They can be downloaded directly from the Saitek website by browsing to the Saitek section and scrolling down to 'Saitek R440 Force Feedback Wheel'. The site also has links to the Saitek Smart Technology profile editor that I personally never found a use for.

Fixing the Force Feedback problem: I think the drivers are originally for Windows 7 and hence the force feedback encounters some issues on modern versions of Windows. However, this can be easily resolved by following the instructions below:
1. Delete any folder in the registry starting with "VID_06A3" in the folder HKEY_CURRENT_USER\System\CurrentControlSet\Control\MediaProperties\PrivateProperties\Joystick\OEM".
2. Delete the two entries referring to the R440 wheel in the device manager, make sure to select the checkbox to delete the driver software when doing so.
3. (Re)install newest driver package from the Saitek website.
To the purchaser of my device as well as to any other R440 users around: May the Force be with you!

Sundry #7: Superzoom on the Supermoon

It isn't exactly today's supermoon because although I caught a glimpse of it, I didn't record it. In fact, I thoroughly despise the term, probably to the same extent as Neil deGrasse Tyson. To bring home the point, I have instead posted this image from a few months back, captured at 90x zoom on the Panasonic V270. Since it is a video grab, you are effectively looking at a 2 MP image, but since when did the moon's resolution start to matter?

The complete "moon shot" was previously uploaded to YouTube, set to Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata.