Review #52: Tale of three (make that five) 3-in-1 cables


Cables are like humans, more than one can imagine. Looks can be deceiving and it is what's inside that matters. However, one can only perceive what one can see and hence the truth lies largely concealed. Thankfully, that is where the similarities end since marketing buzzwords like "gold plated", "tinned copper", "braided nylon" wouldn't really work well as complements for humans.

My tryst for the holy grail of cables started some time back when I started off with the Flome 3-in-1 cable, which, for the record, left me thoroughly disappointed. I have resigned myself to the fact that as long as reputable brands don't get in to the game, the possibility of expecting the ultimate phone charging cable to come from no-name brands in China is as large as catching the unicorn at the end of the rainbow. However, that hasn't deterred me from trying.

Since my last look at charging cables, I have added a couple more 3-in-1 cables, one from Baseus and another from "Fake Mi". The Baseus brand has proliferated quite a bit and I had my first go at it when I purchased a tempered glass for my iPhone. As it turned out, the mention of glass for the product was an euphemism but even then, the brand gets full marks for design and half for deception. I had a good experience with Mi's 2-in-1 cable which I had received with the Mi Power Bank Pro and although there is no mention of a 3-in-1 cable on Mi China's website, I went along for the ride by placing an order for the "Fake Mi" 3-in-1 cable. In this case, it was better to judge the cable by its cover since the package was branded as "Zaofeng" but the product could easily pass off  as an official Mi one.

Along with these three "the last cable you will ever need" cables, I have roped in two "not so in name but in function" pseudo 3-in-1 cables in the form of the Mi 2-in-1 and the EasyAcc Micro USB cable. In case you are confused, then don't be, as technically any Micro USB cable can be used as a Lightning or Type-C cable with the help of adapters. Sure, you don't get the official certifications, but it can get the job done as far as charging is concerned. In this case, the adapters came from the cannibalisation of other cables. After all, all's fair in love, war and charging.

Here's the fate of the contenders after being put through the trial with an Anker PowerPort 4 charger.


It is easy to draw some quick observations/conclusions from the above.

  • As expected, none of the 3-in-1 cables are up to much good, though the Baseus one seems to be the best of the lot. The finest option yet, as far as charging goes, is to get a good quality Micro USB cable and then use adapters to switch between devices.
  • The adapter quality can affect charging as can be seen by the performance difference of the Lightning one between Flome and Zaofeng. They are available for a few cents and can be jerry-rigged to function like a 3-in-1, though I presume at some point someone will release adapters with clasps. Cannibalisation from existing cables is always an option.
  • It is not a co-incidence that the shorter cables are usually the best. You should get a cable that is only as long as you need it to be. As I had mentioned previously, the longer they are, the easier they fail.
  • While not visible in the table above, the iPhone current draw was markedly different from the Mi devices. While the Mi devices charged flat out at the same current level irrespective of usage, the iPhone switched between 0.9-1.7A  depending on how the device was being utilised. I could draw the maximum current only by recording in 4K. This indicates that the iPhone maintains a preset charging rate for the battery while utilising additional current draw from the charger for on-screen activity. I guess these benefits come through the utilisation of much more expensive power management ICs.

Musing #50: Apple Music, Spotify and Amazon Music


Amazon launched its Music service in India earlier this week, so I thought I'd do a quick comparison of it with the other streaming services I have been using, Apple Music and Spotify. Before any one brings it up, I have trialled all the other music streaming services available locally in India (Gaana, Wynk, Saavn, Hungama) at one point or another and found them to disappointing in terms of quality and catalogue. Even Google Music didn't offer much to dislodge Apple when it launched in India, though it hit the mark with its pricing.

I didn't term this article as a review, since it isn't one. Since majority of my listening is done on the iPhone, now with my RHA MA650, Apple Music happens to be my preferred option. It offers the best integration with iOS (e.g. Siri) and has the best quality when streaming over Bluetooth. Spotify complements Apple Music really well with its cross-platform compatibility, track discovery and catalogue. On the other hand, I wouldn't really pay for Amazon Music if it existed as a separate subscription service but as yet another Prime membership perk, it is totally worth it.

I have briefly covered the features of each service in the table below along with the availability of various tracks at the time of writing this article. It should give a good idea of what each platform has to offer.


Review #50: RHA MA650 Wireless Earphones ★★★★☆

When wireless doesn't mean getting less! 


Bluetooth headsets have always been a matter of convenience for me rather than a technological evolution over wired headsets. For a long time, I preferred to use wired headsets whenever possible and took recourse to Bluetooth headsets when on the move. However, the abysmal performance of Bluetooth plug-in headsets like SBH54 and the Fiio BTR1 left me extremely disappointed and finally set me on course to finding a standalone wireless earphone.

Review #45: Mi A1 (Updated with Oreo impressions) ★★★★☆

An A1 Choice


The Android One programme was launched in 2014 with the intention of being the entry point for budget conscious users. Perhaps it was the choice of hardware or OEMs that ultimately made it a stillborn venture. On the other end of the spectrum, the Pixel hasn't quite turned out to be the iPhone killer that Google might have envisaged. However, Google isn't one to take things lying down and hence we now have the reinvigorated Android One programme. This time Google has taken a much more hands-off approach, with this being no more than a branding exercise and the entire onus of the device specification as well as updates following squarely on the shoulders of the OEM.

For an OEM like Xiaomi that is well entrenched in MIUI, it certainly came as a surprise when it was mentioned as the first partner of the new avatar of Android One. At the same time, it seemed a logical choice considering the stranglehold that various Mi devices now have at the budget segment of the market. I had already "upgraded" the Redmi Note 3 of one of my family members to LineageOS to make the device more usable and while getting another Mi device, it was a toss-up between getting a Redmi Note 4 and flashing it with LineageOS or getting the Mi A1 with stock android on board. Ultimately, the novelty of the dual camera setup as well as a manufacturer supported implementation of stock Android justified the premium.

While the review is focussed on the Mi A1, I found it a good idea to compare it with the other phones I have at my disposal which is the Redmi Note 3 and the iPhone 7. The Note 3 should be a good comparison coming from the same stable but based on a year-old higher performance chipset while the iPhone 7 acts like a good benchmark.

Review #47: Walnutt Flexible Bumper Case (iPhone) ★★★☆☆



A bump in the road!
A bumper case is a sweet compromise between using the phone as manufactured and sheathing it in a figurative armour. The RhinoShield CrashGuard has done well in this space and while price is a genuine concern when purchasing it in India, it also has its fair share of issues with its width, buttons and removal. Far cry from that is the 'Walnutt' bumper case. Going by the different brands and prices this case is sold under, it seems to be a generic case, rather than one from a specific company.

Review #46: Fiio BTR1 (Bluetooth Amplifier with AK4376 DAC) ★★★☆☆ (Updated!)

A small device with big sound on a budget.
The removal of the headphone jack on phones is a recent phenomenon but I have been dilly-dallying with clip-on, stereo Bluetooth headsets for quite some time. The excuse for doing so was convenience, at the expense of sound quality. Without putting so much as a thought, I went with Sony in those days and hence my initial experience revolved around the MW-600 and SBH54. However, while the MW-600 was a solid device for its time, the SBH54 was a huge disappointment. Hence, Sony was never in consideration for my next device.

With the iPhone 7 being my primary device, I gave some thought to using a lightning connector device prior to considering other Bluetooth choices. The 1More Triple Driver was certainly at the top of the list but the price premium for the lightning version put it beyond the price range I was looking at. Another option was to go for a 3.5mm adapter and the i1 turned out to be the most prominent among the limited options available, but it didn't take much to understand that it didn't really offer a better value proposition compared to Apple's adapter. However, it was this visit to the Fiio site for the i1 that put me on course to the BTR1.

Review #10: Sony SBH54 Bluetooth Headset (October 2017 update) ★★★☆☆

Good design, let down terribly by software and connectivity
Update #6 (Oct 30, 2017): For the first time in a long time, an update is not about the latest firmware. I recently got my hands on the Fiio BTR1, so stay tuned for that review later in the week. However, over the course of testing that device, I revisited the SBH54 and finally checked its codec support. Sony only lists support for the A2DP v1.2 profile, so the exact codec support isn't clear and I can't believe that I didn't test for it until now. Guess it's better late than never.

1. SBH54 has AAC support, so Apple Music and local AAC files are directly transmitted to the SBH54 without re-encoding.
2. The device doesn't support the optional MP3 codec, so direct decoding of it fails. Since the SBH54 also lacks aptX support, MP3 files are re-encoded to SBC prior to transmission.
3. Similar to MP3, Spotify streams in Ogg Vorbis are re-encoded to the much inferior SBC prior to transmission to the SBH54.
There you have it. The complete list of codec support includes the optional AAC in addition to the mandatory SBC. I assume that Sony also didn't include support for its proprietary ATRAC codec, but even if it did, it's redundant and doesn't have any practical usage. So, AAC (Apple Music) files are the best way to go on the SBH54 as they are played back natively, to the best of the device's ability. Meanwhile, if your MP3 collection and Spotify didn't sound so good on the SBH54, then you know why.

Musing #41: iPhone X - The new generation 5C

Every "expert" worth his/her salt has formed an opinion on the iPhone X by now, so why should this armchair expert be left behind? You will have to go back only 4 years to the iPhone 5C (remember that?) to find an instance where Apple generated a lot of divided opinions over a new product. On the face of it, it would seem preposterous to compare the 5C to the X considering how the two were positioned and yet, strategically, it is not too different.

I would be upfront about the fact that it would be sad to see Apple succeed with the iPhone X. This is coming from an iPhone 7 user. In case you are wondering, I absolutely miss the headphone jack. The Lightning EarPods suffer from poor fit and low volume. The adapter is one ugly umbilical cord having the same volume issues. I hate having to charge (and pair) my Bluetooth headset. To add to the misery, there are no real (read, value for money) alternatives available as far as Lightning connector earphones are concerned. In short, I feel like a doofus in having spent a small fortune in affirming Apple's opinion about the headphone jack. At the same time, I absolutely love the solid-state Home "button" coupled with the Taptic engine and the stereo speakers. My major focus was on security and privacy which could have been served with any iOS device but it was certainly worth getting the iPhone 7 over the 6S.

So, why ought the X not succeed? Simply because it will set a new benchmark for the pricing of smartphones. The price certainly doesn't justify the features you are getting over the 7 or 8 or the Plus variants, but it would indicate the customer's willingness to accede to Apple's pricing experiment. Yes, the X is pretty much an experimental product in the same vein as the 5C. Why else would Apple need to accompany it with a "safe" incremental option? It is because Apple is unsure whether it is heading in to the right direction. It is no longer a Jobsian case of "customers don't know what they want" but rather a case of "Apple doesn't know what the customers want". The "new" iPad was a case of Apple bowing to the consumers and embracing the X will be subverting to that cause.

Pricing issues aside, the X doesn't really follow Apple's vision of simplification. It certainly does so from the hardware perspective but it is trying to make up for it using software, resulting in the most grotesque of usability issues. The 7 certainly was a step in the wrong direction but the X is in an altogether different league. The fingers continue to be the primary means of interaction with the iPhone and hence having Face ID precede that step doesn't make things any easier or faster. Apple made it a point to emphasize, using probability, that the face is far more unique than fingerprints. Yet, I can't help think of nefarious ways in which I could surreptitiously use an acquaintance's face to unlock the device. Identical twins and law enforcement would perhaps have it easier compared to Touch ID. Similarly, swiping up to unlock or stopping midway to access the app switcher or bringing down the control centre from the top right are convoluted mechanisms that are not Apple-esque. I can see Face ID being much more useful when the user interface completely shifts to gaze tracking, but right now it is an impediment. Apple has tried to compensate for it by utilising the TrueDepth camera for Animojis, AR and selfie portraits, but they are pure gimmicks to indulge the user who has already bought in to the X. Personally, I was impressed by Portrait Lighting but that isn't exclusive to the X, though it might do a better job with the f/2.4 aperture telephoto lens.

The irony is that the major appeal of the X can be attributed to Samsung's OLED display, apart from the notch for which Apple can claim full credit. One can only imagine that describing the features of the new display must have been killing Apple from the inside as against showering praise on the Apple-designed components. There is no denying that this is the first edition device of a larger strategic roadmap. In that sense, it bears semblance to the first iPhone. It is not meant to have the features that would logically make life easier for Face ID users. Instead, these "revolutionary" updates will "magically" appear at a later date in forthcoming iOS devices which, as per my gut feeling, won't go beyond X as far as nomenclature is concerned. After all, it seems that tech companies are obsessed by the 'X' factor, going by the erstwhile Mac OS X and the current Windows 10. Thus, in more ways than one, the X is the new avatar of the 5C, but I specifically hope for it to be closest to it in sales. The world at large will of course have other ideas and we may have to resign ourselves to the power of the masses, even if it leads down an abyss.